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ISBN:0571211992
Author: Krin Gabbard
ISBN13: 978-0571211999
Title: Hotter Than That: The Trumpet, Jazz, and American Culture
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ePUB size: 1436 kb
FB2 size: 1782 kb
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Language: English
Category: Music
Publisher: Faber & Faber; 1st edition (October 28, 2008)
Pages: 272

Hotter Than That: The Trumpet, Jazz, and American Culture by Krin Gabbard



Includes bibliographical references (p. -232) and index. How Buddy Bolden blew his brains out (but not before he changed the music forever) - From the Pyramids to New Orleans : the trumpet before jazz - Louis Armstrong's beam of lyrical sound - Bending brass : the art of the trumpet maker and my romance with the equipment - Caution : the trumpet may be hazardous to your health - Miles runs the voodoo down. Includes bibliographical references (p.

Hotter Than That book.

This is the smartest book about a single musical instrument that I’ve ever read. Like Miles Davis, who attended Juilliard and apprenticed with Charlie Parker, Krin Gabbard turns his immense learning into lines that are quick, witty, and irresistibly alluring. Robert G. O’Meally, founder of The Center for Jazz Studies at Columbia University. Part of the Melville Library Author Series. Date: Wednesday, September 23 at 12:45 . Location: Javits Room (2nd floor of the Melville Library) Sponsor: University Libraries.

In Hotter Than That, Gabbard writes through jazz toward the wonder and complexity of human achievement, and with wit and grace, reminds us that through music, we can discover love, and through love, we discover the world. George E. Lewis,Case Professor of American Music, Columbia University. This is the smartest book about a single musical instrument that I've ever read. Would jazz exist without the trumpet? The instrument defines the art, as Krin Gabbard demonstrates in this revelatory book. His instrument is an uncommonly keen, probing mind, and, with it, Gabbard redefines the art of jazz. As he has done before, Krin Gabbard has written a book with a vision that is neither mine nor anyone elses's. It is more than unique or exotic. There is always substance to his overview and that substance brings authority, whether you agree with his point of view or not.

A swinging cultural history of the instrument that in many ways defined a century The twentieth century was barely under way when the grandson of a slave picked up a trumpet and transformed American culture.

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Hotter Than That is a cultural history of the trumpet from its origins in ancient Egypt to its role in royal courts and on battlefields, and ultimately to its stunning appropriation by great jazz artists such as Louis Armstrong, Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis, and Wynton Marsalis. The book also looks at how trumpets have been manufactured over the centuries and at the price that artists have paid for devoting their bodies and souls to this most demanding of instruments.

The book is not about American culture. In Gabbard’s telling, African-American trumpeters, living under racist oppression, were only able to express their masculinity through their instruments. He doesn’t take this argument very far. It does provide him an excuse to delve into Bolden, Armstrong and Davis’ personal lives, however, and to devote a chapter to a jazz trumpeters’ version of Hollywood Babylon.

The twentieth century was barely under way when the grandson of a slave picked up a trumpet and transformed American culture. Because it could make more noise than just about anything, the trumpet had been much more declarative than musical for most of its history. Around 1900, however, Buddy Bolden made the trumpet declare in brand-new ways. He may even have invented jazz, or something very much like it.

Journal of Jazz Studies. Open Journal Systems. Unforgivable Whiteness.

A swinging cultural history of the instrument that in many ways defined a centuryThe twentieth century was barely under way when the grandson of a slave picked up a trumpet and transformed American culture. Before that moment, the trumpet had been a regimental staple in marching bands, a ceremonial accessory for royalty, and an occasional diva at the symphony. Because it could make more noise than just about anything, the trumpet had been much more declarative than musical for most of its history. Around 1900, however, Buddy Bolden made the trumpet declare in brand-new ways. He may even have invented jazz, or something very much like it. And as an African American, he found a vital new way to assert himself as a man. Hotter Than That is a cultural history of the trumpet from its origins in ancient Egypt to its role in royal courts and on battlefields, and ultimately to its stunning appropriation by great jazz artists such as Louis Armstrong, Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis, and Wynton Marsalis. The book also looks at how trumpets have been manufactured over the centuries and at the price that artists have paid for devoting their bodies and souls to this most demanding of instruments. In the course of tracing the trumpet’s evolution both as an instrument and as the primary vehicle for jazz in America, Krin Gabbard also meditates on its importance for black male sexuality and its continuing reappropriation by white culture.
Reviews: 5
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I originally bought a hard copy of this book as a gift for a friend, a trumpeter. He loved it, and in turn, recommended that I read it even though I am not a musician. The book is devoted to the development of brass instruments, in particular the trumpet. Some parts of it were a little more detailed that I preferred, but over all this is a very interesting book. Well written. It includes information, not only about the construction of brass instruments, it contains interesting excerpts about famous trumpeters (Armstrong, M. Davis and many more). I recommend this book those who love music and especially those who love & make music. Makes a great gift to any musician friend, by the way.
Windforge
Gabbard has done a reasonably good job exploring the importance of Armstrong but spends entirely too much time on his own playing and a personal investigation of Elkhart, IN-for the record I live in Indianapolis and found this lengthy chapter quite boring.When Krin focuses on trumpeters and their historical importance, he is quite good. The autobiography, not so good. Read his biography of Mingus instead!
Arashilkis
This book mixes jazz history, personal anecdote and cultural criticism to create a very readable and provocative history of the jazz trumpet. Gabbard's book will not replace the more detailed jazz histories on which he relies, but the reader will find interesting takes on the trumpet and black masculinity and the trumpet as the most difficult and painful instrument to play. A brisk history of trumpet-like instruments and a lively discussion of how today's trumpets are made are interspersed with chapters on Buddy Bolden, Louis Armstrong, and Miles Davis. Most other trumpeters get only brief mention. The reader looking for detailed discussions of musical movements, techniques and individual playing styles will be disappointed. But the book is full of interesting tidbits and anecdotes.
Cia
A clear and precise history is given on the Trumpet. This is a great book for trumpeters to know about the origins of the trumpet and the players who made the instrument what it is today.
Conjuril
"Hotter Than That" is on the ROROTOKO list of cutting-edge intellectual nonfiction. Professor Gabbard's book interview ran here as a cover feature on December 26, 2008.