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ISBN:071399522X
Author: Charles Rosen
ISBN13: 978-0713995220
Title: Piano Notes The Hidden World of the Pianist
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ePUB size: 1527 kb
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Language: English
Category: Music
Publisher: ALLEN LANE (2003)
Pages: 256

Piano Notes The Hidden World of the Pianist by Charles Rosen



Known as a performer of Bach, Beethoven, Stravinsky, and Elliott Carter, he has also written highly acclaimed criticism for sophisticated students and professionals. In Piano Notes, he writes for a broader audience about an old friend - the piano itself. Drawing upon a lifetime of wisdom and the accumulated lore of many great performers of the past, Rosen shows why the instrument demands such a stark combination of mental and physical prowess.

Known as a performer of Bach, Beethoven, Stravin. Readers will gather many little-known insights - from how pianists vary their posture, to how splicings and microphone placements can ruin recordings, to how the history of composition was dominated by the piano for two centuries. Stories of many great musicians abound.

Start reading Piano Notes: The Hidden World of the Pianist on your Kindle in under a minute. Regardless of one's level of experience on the piano, this book is an excellent read from a man who knows what he is talking about. It is NOT a book zeroing in on posture or breathing or "don't bang the keys" recitations or 'lectures' but rather a nitty-gritty practical tome that touches on various areas and what life with the keys is all about. The ups and the downs and all in between. Rosen believes the traditional piano recital, complete with grand piano, darkened hall, and the costumed pianist as high priest, is on the way out, largely because of the relative ease of acquiring fine recorded performances of most of the repertoire. I for one hope he's wrong.

Charles Rosen is most familiar as a writer of musicological tomes that leaven profound learning with jokes and provocations. The pianist needs "a genuine love simply of the mechanics and difficulties of playing, a physical need for contact with the keyboard". Some discussion assumes technical knowhow, and a certain US bias is undisguised

In Piano Notes, a finalist for a 2003 National Book Critics Circle Award, Charles Rosen, one of the world's most talented pianists, distills a lifetime of wisdom and lore into an unforgettable tour of the hidden world of piano playing. You'll read about how a note is produced, why a chord can move us, why the piano - "hero and villain" of tonality - has shaped the course of Western music, and why it is growing obsolete

Notes and variations. Simon Callow recognises a kindred spirit as he follows Charles Rosen's guide to the hidden world of the pianist, Piano Notes. In a sense, this book is Being a Pianist. Expect no intimate revelations or magisterial statements. His method is neither autobiographical nor polemical.

New List New Article New Book New Video New Post. Books - "Piano Notes: The Hidden World of the Pianist," by Charles Rosen. View it in the Music Periodicals Database.

In this eloquent, intimate exploration of the delights and demands of the piano, world-renowned concert pianist and music writer Charles Rosen draws on a lifetime's wisdom to consider every aspect of the instrument: from what makes a beautiful sound to suffering from stage fright, from the physical challenges of playing to tales of great musicians, including Vladimir Horowitz's recording tricks, Rachmaninov's hands and why Artur Rubenstein applied hairspray to the keys

Rosen, Charles, 1927-. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Piano notes : the world of the pianist, Charles Rosen.

Dust jacket faded and worn, page edges tanned. Shipped from the U.K. All orders received before 3pm sent that weekday.
Reviews: 7
Hawk Flying
The book is very light in your hand to hold, and very easy to read. Even though the contents are sometimes very technical and professional, Mr. Rosen made it easy and light enough for non-professionals to be able to understand. He tells about piano as an instrument, its mechanics, its charm, and how you can achieve to get the best out of the instrument. My piano hasn't been tuned in 10 years, because I'm so afraid that the piano tuner I choose may ruin it (it happened once). Now I know a lot more about the instrument and its mechanics, I'll know what to tell the tuner about my piano.

Also I was delighted to learn the importance of the piano stool, and how its height can affect your performance.

He also tells you about what is essential to survive in the highly competitious classical piano world. I'm not a professional pianist, but I do a lot of creative works (painting, writing, composing), and his points made a great deal of sense.

It's a very imformative book which you will not regret reading.
Ieslyaenn
It's getting so that if Charles Rosen announced a forthcoming book on the collective memories of his summer vacations during his youth kind of thing, I would buy it! Bottom line, and obviously what I'm saying here is that I like the way he writes 'all' of his books, what he has to say and how he says it! A style that both holds and informs if you will. So too, he's "been the road" so the contents of these books draw on the cumulative wealth of his experiences whether it's a discussion of Beethoven's sonatas, the classical era itself and its stand-outs or this present book on the world of the pianist.

Regardless of one's level of experience on the piano, this book is an excellent read from a man who knows what he is talking about. It is NOT a book zeroing in on posture or breathing or "don't bang the keys" recitations or 'lectures' but rather a nitty-gritty practical tome that touches on various areas and what life with the keys is all about. The ups and the downs and all in between.

BTW, if books like these appeal to you written by folks who have "been there, done that" albeit well 'verifiably' so as is the case with Mr. Rosen, and as they equally appeal to me when I can locate such informative tomes, and as a classical oriented player making no excuses for literally loving the classical war-horse pieces, check out "Piano Pieces" by Russell Sherman [New England Conservatory]. Another great read!

Doc Tony
Beanisend
I begin with a paraphrase from Rosen's book, "A review should cultivate a certain humility before a really fine pianist and writer." Rosen is both. In fact, the man is so talented as to be somewhat intimidating. Not only is he a world-class pianist, he has written volumes on various musical subjects, holds a doctorate in French literature from Princeton, and has served on the faculty at the University of Chicago. He is one of America's remaining public intellectuals.
Rosen's earlier works, "Sonata Forms," "The Classical Style," and "The Romantic Generation," have all entered the canon of works that are absolutely essential for the well-informed musician and critic. "Piano Notes" takes a lighter approach: it is part memoir, part anecdote, always highly opinionated, with some choice gossip thrown in. Often, his tongue is firmly planted in cheek. In other words, it's great reading.
In relatively few well-chosen words, Rosen offers his considered opinions on topics as diverse as Bach performance, piano tuning and regulation, shenanigans in the recording studio, piano conservatories and competitions, the uses and misuses of concerts and recitals, and the best method of piano practicing for pure technique--reading while practicing, but scrupulously avoiding poetry and "really admirable prose" because these interfere with the rhythm of the music. "The most useful, I have found for myself, are detective stories, sociology and literary criticism. However, any reading matter that distracts the mind without engaging the senses or the emotions too powerfully will work." (p. 40).
Rosen believes the traditional piano recital, complete with grand piano, darkened hall, and the costumed pianist as high priest, is on the way out, largely because of the relative ease of acquiring fine recorded performances of most of the repertoire. I for one hope he's wrong. There is something marvelous, as Rosen points out, in caressing those ivory and ebony keys, and having music come out. The person who has never experienced that will never understand the blissful expression on the faces of so many pianists when they can share music with others. But those of us lucky enough to have felt music flow from our fingers and to have placed themselves and others under its thrall, will completely understand when Rosen when rhapsodizes of the pianist's fetishistic need for physical contact with the ebony and ivory, and of the inexpressible beauty that results.
An update end of year 2012: My most recent copy of the New York Review of Books, where Rosen published an amazing number of pithy, often controversial but always interesting essays, discloses that he passed away the in the latter part of this year. Rosen's passing is a loss to be mourned by every person who found herself enthralled by his superb writing or his equally magisterial piano performances. I will certainly miss the Maestro, and will regret not being able to look forward to his next tome. I've tried to collect them all. RIP, dear Charles Rosen; we are so much the poorer for your passing.
Elizabeth
I bought two copies of this book. The first one, I gave it to my concert pianist-mentor so I had to order a second one for myself. Time and time again, my mentor and I find ourselves discussing and re-reading this wonderful cornucopia of pianistic insights, candid opinions, and even backstage drama and rumors. When I first read this book, I thought Rosen was exaggerating the drama and eccentricities in the piano world just a little bit. However, when I had the rare opportunity to interact with eminent pianists (who shall remain unnamed here) during their "day off", I realized that they can be more derisive, condescending but always funnier than one could ever imagine of them. Top artists are indeed mercurial, often with a celebrity-complex but they did not get to where they are by being meek and docile. Rosen's book offers a glimpse of a not-so-innocent world of classical music and a treasure trove of insights in music making. This book is not really about technique or interpretation but a must-have for professional and amateur classical pianists.
Wetiwavas
This is the first book I've read that truly opens up the experience of playing the piano. I took lessons from age seven to sixteen, never practicing enough to become proficient but giving a glimpse of the joy of having a great piece pull you, body and soul, into playing it. Rosen makes so much clearer both how that happens, how it feels, and why it matters.
Yalone
You don't need me to tell you Charles Rosen, great performer, is one of the great writers on music!