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ISBN:0207169969
Author: Pauline Lennon
ISBN13: 978-0207169960
Title: Daddy Come Home: True Story of John Lennon and His Father
Format: lrf azw mbr txt
ePUB size: 1233 kb
FB2 size: 1829 kb
DJVU size: 1628 kb
Language: English
Category: Music
Publisher: Angus & Robertson (UK) (December 6, 1990)
Pages: 208

Daddy Come Home: True Story of John Lennon and His Father by Pauline Lennon



Pauline Lennon married 55-year-old Freddie Lennon when she was 20. The two met during the Christmas holiday in 1966 while both worked in the kitchen of the Toby Jug Hotel in Surrey, England. Pauline discusses her romance and marriage to Freddie in the book. I had previously read that Freddie Lennon married a "Beatle Fan," but Pauline denies this and goes to great lengths to show that she sincerely loved Freddie. In fact, the couple had two children together and seemed to be happily married until Freddie's death in 1976  .

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Author : Pauline Lennon. Publisher : Angus & Robertson. Users who liked this book, also liked. The Beatles and Me on Tour.

HarperCollins Publishers. This is a bandwagon attempt at cashing in. and on that level it succeeds. even though she,s divorced, she still want to cash in on the Lennon name. Glad i only paid a quid for it. Best-selling in Biographies & True Stories. See all. Current slide {CURRENT SLIDE} of {TOTAL SLIDES}- Best-selling in Biographies & True Stories. Battle Scars: A Story of War and All That Follows by Jason Fox (Hardcover, 2018). 3). £. 0 New. -- Used. Becoming Hardcover 13 Nov 2018 by Michelle Obama Hardback Book.

Pauline Jones became John Lennon's step-mother in 1966 when she eloped with John's father Alfred Lennon. It really brought about a new light on an old subject of who Alfred Lennon was and why he acted in the way he did when it came to his first wife Julia and his son John. Most of the book is taken from an autobiography that Alfred wrote in hopes of setting the record straight about his life and behavior, but the book never saw the light of day, because after a falling out with John (during his primal scream days), John forbade him to ever publish it. The manuscript for the book was sent to John the week his father died.

All Authors, Contributors: Pauline Lennon. Find more information about: Pauline Lennon. ISBN: 020716207169960. org/viaf/93477080 ; Pauline Lennon schema:datePublished "1990" ; schema:description "First published: London : Angus & Robertson, 1990. 4507985 ; schema:genre "Biography"@en ; schema:genre "Portraits".

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This book is about Alfred "Freddie" Lennon and his relationship with his son, John Lennon. Published in 1990, it is partly an autobiography of Freddie Lennon and partly a narrative of Pauline Lennon's observations of Freddie and John Lennon. Pauline Lennon married 55-year-old Freddie Lennon when she was 20. In 1990, Pauline published a book called Daddy, Come Home, detailing her life with Alf and his meetings with Lennon.

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Daddy Come Home: True Story of John Lennon and His Father
Reviews: 3
Zainian
This book is a must-read for Beatles "scholars"...people who know more about the Beatles than the band themselves. I say this because it is written by John Lennon's stepmother, Pauline, who was only 19 when she married his father, Alf. The main part of the book was written by Alf for John's benefit...so he could get his side of the story of John's tumultuous childhood. John and Alf had a very precarious relationship because of his painful childhood, and the fact that Alf deserted John when he was only 4 years old. If you don't already know the full story of John's childhood, and the details of his strained relationship with his father, it may be hard for the reader to appreciate and understand both Alf's and Pauline's observations of the "truth" as they saw it. If you do have a fairly good understanding of John Lennon and his early life, then you will revel in this totally different point of view. Other biographers and authors have portrayed pretty much the same story of how both Alf and Julia, John's mother, left John when he was only 4. He was placed in the care of his Auntie Mimi who raised him to adulthood. This book gives a new perspective to what "really" happened, and it challenges the reader to make decisions about what and who you really believe. It tells the story of how John sabotaged Alf's budding music career when a record he made myteriously disappeared from the charts. It goes behind the scenes of John's reunions with Alf (and later Pauline) in later life. It is a great read and a challenge for all Beatles scholars who want to know everything there is to know about the incredible and fascinaing members of the world's most famous band, the Beatles.
Elizabeth
This book is about Alfred "Freddie" Lennon and his relationship with his son, John Lennon. Published in 1990, it is partly an autobiography of Freddie Lennon and partly a narrative of Pauline Lennon's observations of Freddie and John Lennon.

Pauline Lennon married 55-year-old Freddie Lennon when she was 20. The two met during the Christmas holiday in 1966 while both worked in the kitchen of the Toby Jug Hotel in Surrey, England. Pauline discusses her romance and marriage to Freddie in the book. I had previously read that Freddie Lennon married a "Beatle Fan," but Pauline denies this and goes to great lengths to show that she sincerely loved Freddie. In fact, the couple had two children together and seemed to be happily married until Freddie's death in 1976.

The first couple of chapters are based on Freddie's unpublished autobiography and gives detail to the Lennon family history. It also gives some new information on the relationship of Freddie and Julia Stanley, John's mother. Julia was a slim, attractive, unconventional lady. She met Freddie in Sefton Park when she was fourteen. They were friends for years and then later became lovers. During this time, Freddie began working on cruise ships as a bell boy, steward and waiter and would be away from Liverpool for weeks or even months at a time. They were married against the wishes of Julia's father on December 3 1938 and spent their honeymoon at the local cinema. The day after the wedding Julia went back to her parents' home and Freddie sailed for the West Indies working as a steward. Having no place of their own, the couple lived with Julia's parents at 9 Newcastle Road, Liverpool (Near Penny Lane). It was here that John Lennon spent his first few years of life with his parents. However, from 1940 to 1944 Freddie was home for a total of only three months. Julia became inpatient with Freddie's absence and sought companionship with others. Julia became pregnant by a soldier and gave birth to a girl in 1945. The baby was given up for adoption. Julia then met John "Bobby" Dykins in 1946 and would stay with him until her death in 1958. With the marriage effectively over, Freddie asked 5-year-old John to choose between he and his mother. John chose his mother, only to be given to Aunt Mimi Smith who raised him with husband George on Menlove Avenue in Liverpool. This freed Julia so that she could move in with Dykins. Freddie went back to sea and never saw Julia again. Young John ended up losing both parents.

There is an absorbing dynamic in the relationship between John and his father. From their first face-to-face meeting in 1964 to their bitter split in 1970, Pauline has written an interesting account of events from her perspective. She portrays Freddie in the best light possible and is critical of John's actions throughout the book. The first meeting between John and Freddie in 1964 lasted only 20 minutes. Freddie then continued to work as a waiter and later even released his own record to cash in on the Lennon name, but was unsuccessful. At the urging of Charles Lennon, John's uncle, he met his father again in 1967.

In 1967, John had obviously made an attempt to forgive his father for being absent during his childhood. He invited Freddie to live with he, Cynthia and Julian in his Kenwood mansion in London. John even gave Pauline a job as an au pair and let her live at Kenwood. John invited Freddie and Pauline to attend the premier of Magical Mystery Tour with he and the other Beatles. He also began paying Freddie an allowance equivalent to his earnings as a waiter. Finally, he bought and gave Freddie a house in Brighton following his marriage to Pauline and the birth of their first child. However, Pauline paints all of this in a dark light because she feels John owed much more to his father. Most likely the events of 1970 forever changed her opinion of John and she can no longer see the good things that John had done for Freddie.

In 1970, John underwent his much publicized "Primal Scream" therapy with Yoko Ono at Arthur Janov's Primal Institute in Los Angeles. Here he relived the pain of losing his parents as a child. John's repressed anger toward his mother and father was revealed. Janov told John that to exorcize the root causes of his neuroses, John must confront those who inflicted the pain on him. Upon his return to England, John summoned Freddie for a visit on his 30th birthday. Freddie expected a party and brought along Pauline and their child, as well as a birthday gift. John shocked Freddie by abruptly announcing that he was cutting him off completely. He stopped giving Freddie money and kicked he and Pauline out of the house in Brighton. Pauline goes into great detail and it is obvious that this single event created both pain and fear in Freddie Lennon that lasted for years.

From 1970 to 1975, Freddie and Pauline did the best they could on their own and had a second child. Freddie stayed home to care for the children and Pauline worked. It seemed that Freddie was able to erase some of the guilt for neglecting John by being a full-time parent for his two young children. Tragedy struck when Freddie was diagnosed with stomach cancer in 1976. Pauline contacted John and gave him the terrible news. John and Freddie spoke on the telephone and reconciled. John told Freddie that he regretted having gone through primal therapy. He and Freddie even made plans to visit again so that Sean Lennon could meet his grandfather. Unfortunately, Freddie's cancer progressed rapidly and he died shortly afterward. John wanted to pay for the funeral, but Pauline was still bitter and refused his money.

This is an emotional book full of unexpected details, but lacking in hard facts like dates and places. Pauline Lennon's writing is well done, but she tends to use some British slang that has no meaning in American English. There is very little discussion of the Beatles in this book, so I do not recommend this for general Beatle research. For those who wish to gain greater insight into what makes John Lennon tick, I highly recommend this book.
Xal
The book was first published in 1990 and it's the only one from John Lennon's father. Add the knowledge of this book to what you already know and imagine how it all fits in. Some more bricks to the puzzle of John Lennon.