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Download The Innocence of Objects epub book
ISBN:1419704567
Author: Orhan Pamuk
ISBN13: 978-1419704567
Title: The Innocence of Objects
Format: docx azw doc docx
ePUB size: 1498 kb
FB2 size: 1168 kb
DJVU size: 1855 kb
Language: English
Category: History and Criticism
Publisher: Harry N. Abrams; First Edition edition (October 1, 2012)
Pages: 264

The Innocence of Objects by Orhan Pamuk



Cabinet 28 in Orhan Pamuk's Museum of Innocence in Istanbul. As such, this book spills over with pleasure. Using it is like using Italo Calvino’s Invisible Cities as a guidebook to Venice. Fictions and objects and place are all intricately and beautifully held ­together.

The Innocence of Objects-Pamuk’s tour de force and mind-bender about museums, art, artifice, and the place of fiction and the writer in the world-is a nonfiction narrative unlike most you will encounter. This unique art book is a tour of an actual museum, in Istanbul, which Nobel Prize winning author Orhan Pamuk created as a repository of physical objects described the chapters in his 2009 novel The Museum of Innocence. I adore house museums, There are great ones in St. Petersburg- Blok's and Pushkin's, Dostoyevsky's, Akhmatova's, and in Moscow-Tolstoy's, -the Russians are very fond of the. I've been to George Sand's and Victor Hugo's in Paris.

6 quotes from The Innocence of Objects: ‘We don't need more museums that try to construct the historical narratives of a society, community, team, nation. The Innocence of Objects Quotes Showing 1-6 of 6. We don't need more museums that try to construct the historical narratives of a society, community, team, nation, state, tribe, company, or species. We all know that the ordinary, everyday stories of individuals are riches, more humane, and much more joyful. Orhan Pamuk, The Innocence of Objects.

We must read Orhan Pamuk's second novel through the double veneer of time and translation. The majority of the 74 chapters of The Innocence of Objects – the elegant catalogue from the Museum of Innocence that the author opened in Istanbul this year, and which takes its name from his 2008 novel – present relics of 20th-century Istanbul life, mini-essays and novel excerpts. This is the monument that Kemal, the narrator of The Museum of Innocence, used to commemorate his doomed affair with the beautiful Fusun.

Orhan Pamuk received the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2006. He is the Robert Yik-Fong Tam Professor in the Humanities at Columbia University. The Black Book Paperback. The New Life Paperback.

The book jacket of The Innocence of Objects states that Pamuk divides his time between Istanbul and New York City, and this division is signified in the museum by an Ottoman pocket watch belonging to Kemal that has two faces, showing the time in Turkey and Europe ( The East-West Watch, C’est Moi ). It should not evade us that Pamuk’s museum is in the private sector, bought with money made, in large part, from selling a certain vision of Turkey to foreigners. The cozy feel of the museum’s interior, the antiqued numbers over the vitrines, and the faded beauty of its objects are all part of the same curatorial strategy: to generate in us a false sense of longing, a nostalgia for something that neither we nor anyone else has ever experienced.

Orhan Pamuk’s The Innocence of Objects makes me want to stand up and shout! It is a triumph of intimacy over sterility, depth over superficiality, and humanity over inhumanity. It is also the most perfect intersection of art and literature that I have ever encountered. The Huffington Post.

It's getting late in the Istanbul of Orhan Pamuk's new novel (his first since winning the 2006 Nobel prize), late in almost every sense of the word. Not dead, far from that, but the hours are small and time itself seems to be running down, as though the whole city were a memorial to its own better days. Though when was that? Under Ataturk, maybe? Or possibly before, in the Ottoman past that lies all around but of which the book's characters can hardly ever speak  . Both his collecting and The Museum of Innocence itself are best understood as examples of what Pamuk elsewhere calls hüzün. It is the Turkish word for melancholy, but hüzün has a more complicated weight than the English term.

The culmination of decades of omnivorous collecting, Orhan Pamuk’s Museum of Innocence in Istanbul uses his novel of lost love, The Museum of Innocence, as a departure point to explore the city of his youth. In The Innocence of Objects, Pamuk’s catalog of this remarkable museum, he writes about things that matter deeply to him: the psychology of the collector, the proper role of the museum, the photography of old Istanbul (illustrated with Pamuk’s superb collection of haunting photographs and movie stills), and of course the customs and traditions of his beloved city. The book’s imagery is equally evocative, ranging from the ephemera of everyday life to the superb photographs of Turkish photographer Ara Güler. Combining compelling art and writing, The Innocence of Objects is an original work of art and literature.Praise for The Innocence of Objects: "[A] most audacious and provocative take on the history of Turkish culture and politics by Turkey's best-known dissenter." —Publishers Weekly“Orhan Pamuk’s The Innocence of Objects makes me want to stand up and shout! It is a triumph of intimacy over sterility, depth over superficiality, and humanity over inhumanity. It is also the most perfect intersection of art and literature that I have ever encountered.” —The Huffington Post“I bought the Turkish edition of The Innocence of Objects, a richly illustrated book about the museum, and have been waiting for Abrams’ English translation. It’s just come out, and Pamuk’s text about the project is as illuminating as it promised to be.” – The Design Observer“—Pamuk’s tour de force and mind-benderabout museums, art, artifice, and the place of fiction and the writer in theworld—is a nonfiction narrative unlike most you will encounter.” — “[A] squarish volume, filled with gorgeous photographs of the museum’s interior. . . . The exhibition photos are accompanied by Pamuk’s lively, sometimes dazzling commentary, which ranges freely from personal anecdotes to meditations on aesthetics to whimsical ‘memories’ of his fictional protagonist. . . .” —The American Reader “The Innocence of Objects—Pamuk’s tour de force and mind-bender about museums, art, artifice, and the place of fiction and the writer in the world—is a nonfiction narrative unlike most you will encounter.” —Virginian Pilot
Reviews: 7
Hap
Absolutely loved this. Although it is said that you don't have to read the novel that led to the museum in Istanbul about which this book is written, I think it just makes sense if you read the two together. I really liked the novel Museum of Innocence and this book goes amazingly with that novel. The pictures of the objects in the museum really help to give a flavor of having visited the museum. I am not sure if I will ever be able to visit the museum in real life but after read this book, I at least don't feel like I totally missed it. Very well done. Mr. Pamuk is a genius.
Adrielmeena
This volume is a highly unusual, but fascinating companion to Pamuk's latest novel. It not only gives insight into how Pmuk went about planning and writing the novel, but also underscores the major themes and clarifies what Pamuk meant to say in his fine novel.
Damdyagab
Pamuk explores the essence of time and love and life in objects that he has collected and assembled in intriguing boxes in his Istanbul Museum of Innocence. The pictures of those objects forms the bulk of the book. His explanations and annotations serve as guides. A delightful look and read.
just one girl
A most fascinating exploration through the world of memoraibilia collected and now on display by a gifted writer, with an eternally curious mind!
Jorad
It is a companion to Pamuk's museum, and is an excellent way to expand the experience of The Museum of Innocence. His manifesto on what museums can or should be is noble. As always, Pamuk is subtle, warm, and engaging.
Jare
Two well read Turkish women could not get through "The Museum of Innocence" but if you persist, visiting the Museum of Innocence in Istanbul can be tremendously rewarding. You must be as obsessed with finishing the book as the main character is with his lover. The Innocence of Objects is the companion to the museum and is worth buying because they don't allow photographs in the museum. Some of the displays are very clever and memorable!
Qutalan
Excellent and well written book
Easy to read, clear enough to understand, nice cover.
Recommend it highly.
This is a wonderful book for anyone who loves "The Museum of Innocence" by Orhan Pamuk.