» » Drawing from The Modern, Volume 2: 1945-1975
Download Drawing from The Modern, Volume 2: 1945-1975 epub book
ISBN:0870706640
Author: Agnes Martin,Gary Garrels,Carl Andre,Willem de Kooning,Eva Hesse,Jasper Johns,Ellsworth Kelly,Sol Lewitt,Roy Lichtenstein,Brice Marden,Barnett Newman,Claes Oldenburg,Jackson Pollock,Robert Rauschenberg,Richard Serra,Cy Twombly,Dan Flavin
ISBN13: 978-0870706646
Title: Drawing from The Modern, Volume 2: 1945-1975
Format: rtf mbr lrf mobi
ePUB size: 1228 kb
FB2 size: 1522 kb
DJVU size: 1782 kb
Language: English
Category: Architecture
Publisher: The Museum of Modern Art, New York (March 15, 2005)
Pages: 224

Drawing from The Modern, Volume 2: 1945-1975 by Agnes Martin,Gary Garrels,Carl Andre,Willem de Kooning,Eva Hesse,Jasper Johns,Ellsworth Kelly,Sol Lewitt,Roy Lichtenstein,Brice Marden,Barnett Newman,Claes Oldenburg,Jackson Pollock,Robert Rauschenberg,Richard Serra,Cy Twombly,Dan Flavin



Drawing from The Modern, Volume 2: 1945-1975 (Hardcover) Author: Agnes Martin, Gary Garrels, Robert Rauschenberg, Roy Lichtenstein, Dan Flavin, Cy Twombly, Richard Serra, Jackson Pollock, Claes Oldenburg, Barnett Newman, Brice Marden, Sol Lewitt, Ellsworth Kelly, Jasper Johns, Eva Hesse, Willem de Kooning, Carl Andre Publisher: The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Drawing from the Modern, 1945-1975, surveys the drawing of the period through the unparalleled holdings of the drawings collection of The Museum of Modern Art. The postwar period saw the development of Abstract Expressionism in New York, followed by Pop art, Minimal art, and Conceptual art, and the Museum's collection has exceptional strength in these areas. Abstract drawings by Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning and Barnett Newman open this volume, followed by works by such key figures as Jasper Johns, Ellsworth Kelly and Cy Twombly. Next, drawings by Roy Lichtenstein, Claes Oldenburg and Andy Warhol signal the arrival of a new figurative art at the forefront of creativity.

DRAWING from the MODERN is the first of a three part series published by MOMA as catalogue to accompany the chronologically arranged exhibitions of their drawing collection; in part, celebration of the seventy fifth anniversary of the founding of the Museum. This first book looks at the late nineteenth century through the beginning of the twentieth. I just noticed that some customers' opinions of 'Drawing from the Modern' differ significantly from one another. Personally, I think Volume 2 is quite nice and I'm happy to have a copy at home. There are 178 color images and 9 black-and-white ones.

B Gary Garrels will join the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) as the new Elise S. Haas Senior Curator of Painting an. Exhibitions he organized there include the acclaimed Brice Marden: A Retrospective of Paintings and Drawings (2006), which traveled to San Francisco and Berlin; Drawing from the Modern, Part II, 1945–1975 (2005); and Roth Time: A Dieter Roth Retrospective (2004), which was awarded Best . Monographic Museum Show of the year by the International Association of Art Critics (AICA). He was also a member of the curatorial committee for MoMA at El Museo: Latin American and Caribbean Art from the Collection of The Museum of Modern Art, exhibited at El Museo del Barrio (2004).

Richard Serra (born November 2, 1938) is an American artist involved the Process Art Movement. He lives and works in Tribeca, New York and on the North Fork, Long Island.

Want to sell a work by this artist?

Drawing now. Bernice rose. The museum of modern art. New york. The 45 artists included in this major exhibition of drawings are: Carl andre.

Book DescriptionDrawing Modern illustrates major pieces by some of the twentieth century?s most important artists, including Louise Bourgeois, Arshile Gorky, Eva Hesse, Jasper Johns, Ellsworth Kelly, Paul Klee, Roy Lichtenstein, Brice Marden, Bruce Nauman, and Cy Twombly. Works by a younger generation of artists are also included, among them William Kentridge, Gabriel Orozco, and Rosemary Trockel  . Enlightened Metropolis.

Willem de Kooning - Painting - 1948 Elaine de Kooning - Untitled No. 15 - 1948 Harry Callahan - Weed Against the Sky - 1948 Barnett Newman - Onement I - 1948 Bernard Perlin - Orthodox Boys - 1948 Jackson Pollock - Tondo - 1948 Jackson Pollock - Number 1 - 1948 Mark Rothko - No. 18 - 1948 Mark Rothko - Untitled/Fuzziness - 1948 Aaron Siskind - Chicago 3/Auto Graveyard - 1948 Clyfford Still - 1948-D - 1948 Clyfford Still . 1963 Jim Dine - Hatchet with Two Palettes, State - 1963 Agnes Martin - Night Sea - 1963 Robert Rauschenberg - Pelican Dance - 1963 Robert Rauschenberg - Estate - 1963 David Smith - Cubi XVII - 1963 Michael Snow - Beach - hcaeb - 1963 Andy Warhol - Orange Disaster/Car - 1963 Andy Warhol - Orange Disaster/Electric Chair - 1963 Joyce Wieland - Nature Mixes - 1963 David Smith - Wagon I - 1963-64 Sorel Etrog - Flight No. 1

Visual art in the period following World War II witnessed landmark transformations. Today, drawing provides a powerful and vigorous device for reexamining the art of that period, and for renewing appreciation of the extraordinary achievements of well-known artists--and for discovering others. Even though the art of these years saw radical departures and shifts, drawing, which is among the most traditional of media, played a crucial and consistent role in the work of a great majority of the most significant artists. Drawing from the Modern, 1945-1975, surveys the drawing of the period through the unparalleled holdings of the drawings collection of The Museum of Modern Art. The postwar period saw the development of Abstract Expressionism in New York, followed by Pop art, Minimal art, and Conceptual art, and the Museum's collection has exceptional strength in these areas. Abstract drawings by Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning and Barnett Newman open this volume, followed by works by such key figures as Jasper Johns, Ellsworth Kelly and Cy Twombly. Next, drawings by Roy Lichtenstein, Claes Oldenburg and Andy Warhol signal the arrival of a new figurative art at the forefront of creativity. But reductive and abstract art kept pace, and the Museum's collection offers a breathtaking array of drawings by Carl Andre, Dan Flavin, Eva Hesse, Sol LeWitt, Brice Marden, Agnes Martin, Richard Serra and numerous others. What constitutes “progress” in art is questioned today, and it is no longer possible to see the development of art as a straight line, with synchronicity among places and geographies. But drawing, by its very nature, encourages established understandings to be examined and accepted values to be reappraised. Many of the artists represented here defy easy categorization, including Lee Bontecou, Louise Bourgeois, Vija Celmins, Bruce Conner, Ray Johnson, Jim Nutt and Myron Stout. The resurgence of European art is represented by drawings by Georg Baselitz, Joseph Beuys, Marcel Broodthaers, Piero Manzoni, Henri Michaux, Mario Merz and Sigmar Polke, among others. A number the most important artists working in Latin America in the postwar period are also represented, including Jorge de la Vega, Gego, León Ferrari, Hélio Oiticica and Mira Schendel. While neither the collection nor this volume is encyclopedic, the spirit and achievements of postwar art are distilled and amply celebrated here.
Reviews: 4
Kriau
DRAWING from the MODERN is the first of a three part series published by MOMA as catalogue to accompany the chronologically arranged exhibitions of their drawing collection; in part, celebration of the seventy fifth anniversary of the founding of the Museum.

This first book looks at the late nineteenth century through the beginning of the twentieth. Care and preservation of these drawings dictate that they are displayed infrequently, paper being a delicate medium, subject to fading, discoloration and brittleness. The publication of this series then allows us to have at hand a history of drawings seldom seen, and a visual education demonstrating how problems of that era both evolved and worked themselves out.

The introduction by Jodi Hauptman is broad and well worth reading. Aside from her entertaining "end of art" stories, she addresses artists and process leading to the dissolution of prevalent notions: relationship of "mark" to "ground", took new form; spatial notions of an orderly page, questioned; the element of chance, explored as process; the ego relationship of an artist to work, dissolving. New imagery happened: collage, abstraction, grids, enhanced emotions, metaphors of feeling, the sublime re-imaged. New subjects explored brutalities of war, notions of "city", identity, the spiritual, and the abstract.

As perhaps with all process of art, the uncertainty of change brought forth much that is new. The 139 plates of drawings both demonstrate and give testimony by leading artists of the time to new era in process. Drawing as subject matter is fascinating. To be expected, the book is well printed. Of course, what is book one without book two and three?

Nancy Gutrich
JoldGold
This is not a good artbook. The images are way too small to be satisfying. This book could have been great, but falls way short of its potential. Don't buy it, you will be disappointed.
Beabandis
I just noticed that some customers' opinions of 'Drawing from the Modern' differ significantly from one another. But in reality, little has been said so far about Volume 2 of MoMA's 3-volume series (which was originally available as a box set that is currently out of print and sold out on Amazon), so I figured I'd chip in my 2 cents. Personally, I think Volume 2 is quite nice and I'm happy to have a copy at home. There are 178 color images and 9 black-and-white ones. Like the publisher's description suggests, there are examples of Abstract Expressionism, Pop, Minimal and Conceptual Art. You'd be surprised by the variety of works that can be considered "drawings" by the MoMA. Some are serious, like Pollock's image on the cover, while others are of a more whimsical nature. Several pages are dedicated to an interesting explanation of how drawings evolved during the 30-year period that is covered. This is not a huge, heavy book, but it's not thin either (product dimensions: 8.3 x 1.1 x 10.3 inches). It offers high-quality reproductions with sharp lines and very good color... but it's true that most of them are of a somewhat reduced size. This is because the designer chose to have lots of white space around the images and small type. To some extent, I understand the frustration expressed in a few reviews and in a way also wish the images were a little larger, so that I could better appreciate the detail. But at the same time, I enjoy the quiet feeling that I get from the clean design and become excited every time I go through the collection of works. This is a book for people who love modern drawings. And if you like to draw, it's very possible that you'll find inspiration there. (That is why I bought it.) Therefore, I'm giving it a rating of 4, which is closer to 5 than it is to 3.
Jothris
I purchased book 1 & 2 from Amazon. The illustrations are far too small to be a professionally represented art book from MOMA I've decided to save my money rather than pay out for the 3rd edition. It sounds a good buy from its description but I don't consider this trilogy to be very satisfactory.